Monday, June 29, 2015

Writing Mini Lesson #24- Revising a Narrative Essay- Delete

In lesson #23, I shared DARE as the steps to revising.  This lesson will focus on the first letter- D.  D stands for DELETE unnecessary information.  Many times students add things that aren't needed for their story.  See below for an example.  After sharing the poster (or creating your own paragraph with an added sentence or two that doesn't make sense or fit) with the students, have them go through their own rough drafts and delete things that interrupt the flow to the story or don't belong.



Next writing mini lesson #25- will be DARE to Revise- ADD

Like always, 
ROCK 'N' WRITE!!!!

If you would rather have all of the these mini lessons (over 400 pages) in one spot along with tracking forms, goal forms, prompts, practice sheets, etc, etc.  Click on the pic below!  Boost those test scores with a year-long writing program!


Effective Ways to Teach Greek and Latin Words and Vocabulary

I was asked to be a guest blogger on Who's Who and Who's New Blog.  Click on the picture below to get to the blog post!


Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Writing Mini Lesson #23- Revising a Narrative Essay

Revising a Narrative Essay-  
Students are finished with their rough drafts and what do they want to do?  Immediately write a final copy.  NOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!  I stress the importance of revising.  Be excited about writing!  Model some writing!  They will want to imitate your enthusiasm!  Mention a few of their favorite authors and explain how they NEVER I mean NEVER take a rough draft and try to publish it.  They ALWAYS revise!  Don't get confused with the steps related to mechanics like capitalization, usage, punctuation and spelling.  That will come later.  This step is making the content of writing better!  See the transformation of writing into an amazing piece of art!

It is always good to share a mentor text for revising.  A suggestion is Hooray for Diffendoofer Day by Jack Pretlutsky and Dr. Seuss.  The appendix shows how famous authors find the need to revise!  Remind them that even the best authors revise, edit, revise, edit, over and over before they even think about the publishing stage.  Roald Dahl's website is an amazing resource to share with your students.  There is an interview with him where he talks about the importance of revising.  I am in awe over this humble man. 



I call this step DARE to REVISE.  I DARE YOU!!!!!!!
It helps to read the rough draft out loud!  When students read their own papers out loud, they can HEAR where they are making errors.  I love it when a student is reading a writing piece to me out loud and says, "I didn't mean to say that!"  I reply, "This is exactly why we are revising!"  "Think like an author!"  It reinforces what I've been telling them all along!  I like to give them options. They can read it to a peer or record it on a device where they can play it back to LISTEN for places to revise.


Students will need:
* A rough draft essay
* Colored pens or pencils
* Thesaurus
* Notebook
* Glue and scissors (if using interactive notebooks)

Whether you have your students create interactive notebooks or simply take notes in a notebook, have them add the following acronym:

D- Delete unnecessary information
A- Add more important detail and transition words.
R- Rearrange text to be logical and effective. 
E-  Exchange words for clearer and stronger ones.

As you can see, I tried changing it to READ to Revise.  I have to say my kids liked DARE to revise much more!  Sooooo I changed it back for this coming year.  It has the same skills, just a more motivating way to get them to revise.  I thought having READ would give them the idea to read it out loud, but I can honestly say, I can motivate them more when I DARE them!  We all learn from our mistakes!


I hope this helps in your writing lessons!  Next up:  Writing Mini Lesson #24 is exploring the D- DELETE when revising in a Narrative Essay!


Like always, 
ROCK 'N' WRITE!!!!

If you would rather have all of the these mini lessons (over 400 pages) in one spot along with tracking forms, goal forms, prompts, practice sheets, etc, etc.  Click on the pic below!  Boost those test scores with a year-long writing program!









Sunday, May 17, 2015

Writing Mini Lesson #22- Writing a Rough Draft for a Narrative Essay


Now that students have their conclusions written, it is time to write!  Woo woo!  Time to write!  Lesson 22 focuses on writing rough drafts.

1.  Start off the lesson by intro ducting all the rough draft elements below.  Remind them that this is Step 2 of the writing process!



2.  Have students take notes in their notebook.


 3.  Next, model writing a rough draft in class.  Make sure you make mistakes along the way!  I love it when they want to correct me right away when I make a mistake.  I laugh and say, "It is my rough draft!  I have to just write and not think about the mechanics!  Let me write!  I don't want to lose my focus."  Of course, I over exaggerate.  Imagine that!  Plus with these mistakes, it will help you later when teaching students how to revise and edit!

4.  Now it is the students' turn to write.  My students like to write around the room like below.  If this helps them write, then why not?




I hope this helps in your writing lessons!  Next up:  Writing Mini Lesson #23 is revising in a Narrative Essay!


Like always, 
ROCK 'N' WRITE!!!!

If you would rather have all of the these mini lessons (over 400 pages) in one spot along with tracking forms, goal forms, prompts, practice sheets, etc, etc.  Click on the pic below!  Boost those test scores with a year-long writing program!




Thursday, May 7, 2015

10 STEPS TO MAKING CHOCOLATE

10 STEPS TO MAKING CHOCOLATE 

Prep:

1.  Send out notice to parents for ingredients. I like to use www.signupgenius.com.  I will add a list of ingredients!
2.  The morning of making the chocolate, bring a crockpot, spatula, wooden spoon, and serving spoon.  
3.  Melt the chocolate chips on low.  Stir occasionally.  We were drooling from the smell of melted chocolate!!
4.  Set up the other ingredients in bowls around a table with a spoon for serving.
5.  Cut paper approximately 2 inches by 4 inches for labels.
6.  Prepare the foil.  Tear approximately 2 ft per student and fold it over once.  
7.  Tear out another piece of foil approximately 4 inches.
8.  Write each students' name on a quart sized baggie.

Making Bars:

1.  Create and color a unique label for your candy bar.  Set aside.  


2.  Students need to use the foil to create a shape of their choice leaving a hole to pour ingredients.


3. An adult will put your foil on a paper plate and place a scoop of creamy chocolate in the foil.  


4.  Next, fill your foil with your choice of ingredients!
     RICE KRISPIES, M&M'S, MARSHMALLOWS, GUMMY BEARS, OREO PIECES, 
     TOFFEE  PIECES, SPRINKLES, CARMEL PIECES, ANY OTHER CANDIES!  
     (I TRY TO AVOID NUTS AND PEANUT BUTTER.)



5.  Then, stir ingredients together with a plastic spoon.  


6.  Take the smaller piece of foil and seal the opening.  



7.  Using thick clear packaging tape, tape the label on top.  

8.  Place foil in plastic bag.

9.  Last, place bag in refrigerator or cooler with ice to harden!

10.  When ready, guess what?  It is time for a taste!!!!!!

I promise your students will talk about it for years! Whenever I get a visit from a past student, they always mention our chocolate unit and I am known throughout the school as the teacher who makes chocolate!  In case you are wondering if I make one for myself, we'll hello?  Every year I make one for myself and I have my students who finish first make them for our principals!  Any kind of brown (chocolate) nosing works!

How do I keep children from tasting?  I let them taste!  I usually have so many ingredients.  I tell them ahead of time to keep their plates and spoons so I can give them some warm chocolate with ingredients left over to taste!  Happy chocolate makers!!!!!

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A FUN CHOCOLATE WEB QUEST TO DO WITH YOUR STUDENTS?


Sunday, April 5, 2015

Writing Mini Lesson #21- Writing the Conclusion of a Narrative Essay

Were your students successful with the last lesson on dialogue?  I hope they are keeping their quotation marks to a minimum!

Next up is writing a conclusion in a narrative essay.  This lesson is short and sweet!

Common Core Standard:  We can provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

What is a conclusion?  It is the end of the story or solution to the problem.  The readers should be reminded of the main idea and feel that the story has come a full circle with an ending.

After this explanation is given and students take notes in their writing notebooks, write the conclusion to your class story together.  See example below.


Below is one of my students working around the room on his conclusion and adding it to his graphic organizer.

This is a picture of one of my student's graphic organizer for her narrative essay:



After students finish their graphic organizer, have them decide on a goal they would like to achieve in their writing.  Do they want to work on a better:

introduction?
body?
conclusion?
dialogue?
capitals?
punctuation?
spelling?
complete sentences?
handwriting?
paragraph form?
topic sentences?
details?
transition words?

What goal should students create?  
1.  Anything that you have taught in a past writing lesson and are expected to use in future essays.
2.  One of the past lessons that they need more time to develop.
3.  Focus on one goal!  (I like to give extra credit or some prize if they achieve their goal.)

Here is a free template for students to write a goal.  It can be placed in their writing notebooks or attached to their essay's final copy.  


Next writing mini lesson #22- will be writing a rough draft in Narrative Writing!

Like always, 
ROCK 'N' WRITE!!!!

If you would rather have all of the these mini lessons (over 400 pages) in one spot along with tracking forms, goal forms, prompts, practice sheets, etc, etc.  Click on the pic below!  Boost those test scores with a year-long writing program!


Saturday, April 4, 2015

Blog Hop- Hoppy Easter!




Happy Easter friends!  I am so glad that it is spring time and Easter weekend!  Nothing is better than having a house full of family!  We just got done eating a delicious French Toast casserole, fresh fruit salad, and turkey bacon.  I made the casserole last night while we were hanging out around the island having some wine and catching up.  All I had to do was pop it in the oven this morning!  Easy peasy! Click on the picture for the recipe!  You won't be disappointed!



I am thankful that we can all be together.  We live in different states and some traveled far to get to our house.  It is a great time to be thankful.  Jesus died for us on the cross and rose from the dead.  How amazing is that?  When hope seems impossible, think about what he did for us and keep praying!  Nothing is impossible!

I am thankful to my followers and want to offer a free lesson for April.  To go along with a spring theme, I am giving away, a free poetry lesson.  Change rain to sunshine in a diamante!  The directions are included so you can place them on a smart board!  The printable would look adorable as a hall display!



Want a chance to win a beautiful customized spring wreath?  My friends and I at Upper Grade Memoirs are giving away this Spring wreath designed by Marina's Custom Designs.  Want a chance to win?  Go to our blog, UPPER GRADE MEMOIRS for a chance to win the customized Spring wreath!  Are they not the cutest ever?




Follow the Upper Grades Memoirs Blog Hop for more Spring Ideas and freebies!  BLOG HOP





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